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Mandrax (Quaalude) 300mg

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Quaaludes

Generic name: methaqualone, Methaqualone is a sedative and hypnotic medication. It was sold under the brand names Quaalude and Sopor among others, which contained 300 mg of methaqualone, and sold as a combination drug under the … Wikipedia

FormulaC16H14N2O
Molar mass250.3 g/mol
CAS ID72-44-6
Elimination half-lifeBiphasic (10–40; 20–60 hours)
ATC codeN05CM01 (WHO)
Pronunciation/mɛθəˈkweɪloʊn/

Common brand names: Quaalude, Sopor
Other formal names: Cateudil, Dormutil, Hyminal, Isonox, Melsed, Melsedin, Mequelone, Mequin, Methadorm, Mozambin, Optimil, Parest, Renoval, Somnafac, Toquilone Compositum, Triador, Tuazole.
Common or street names: Bandits, Beiruts, Blou Bulle, Disco Biscuits, Ewings, Flamingos, Flowers, Genuines, Lemmon 714, Lemons, Lennons, Lovers, Ludes, Mandies, Qua, Quaaludes, Quack, Quad, Randy Mandies, 714, Soaper, Sopes, Sporos, Vitamin Q, Wagon Wheels

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What are Mandrax (Quaalude) 300mg?

Mandrax (Quaalude) 300mg (methaqualone) are a synthetic, barbiturate-like, central nervous system depressant and a popular recreational drug in the U.S. from the 1960s until the 1980s, when its use was made illegal by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). The active ingredient, methaqualone, is an anxiolytic (lowers anxiety) and a sedative-hypnotic drug that leads to a state of drowsiness.

These drugs, imprinted with the number “714” on the tablet, were initially introduced as a safe barbiturate substitute to help induce sleep, but were later shown to have addiction and withdrawal symptoms similar to other prescription barbiturates.

Quaaludes are rarely encountered on the streets in the U.S. today, but are occasionally confiscated coming across the border.

Quaalude was popular in the US in the 1970s. Now, the drug is back in the headlines after the revelation that comedian Bill Cosby admitted getting them to give to women he wanted to have sex with.

The admission was made in 2005, but the court papers were only released this week.

They refer back to a period when Quaalude was taken as a recreational drug – so much so that the sedative pill has been banned in the US for over 30 years.

Uses of Mandrax (Quaalude) 300mg

In 1972, Quaaludes were one of the most frequently prescribed sedatives in United States.

In prescribed doses, Quaaludes promotes relaxation, sleepiness and sometimes a feeling of euphoria (happiness, calmness). It causes a drop in blood pressure and slows the pulse rate. These properties are the reason why it was initially thought to be a useful sedative and anxiolytic.

It became a recreational drug due to its euphoric (“high”) effect. Quaaludes were a popular drug of abuse during much of the 1970s, even though both the US and Britain tightened control around their use and dispensing.

What are Quaalude?

Quaaludes (methaqualone) are a synthetic, barbiturate-like, central nervous system depressant and a popular recreational drug in the U.S. from the 1960s until the 1980s, when its use was made illegal by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). The active ingredient, methaqualone, is an anxiolytic (lowers anxiety) and a sedative-hypnotic drug that leads to a state of drowsiness.

These drugs, imprinted with the number “714” on the tablet, were initially introduced as a safe barbiturate substitute to help induce sleep, but were later shown to have addiction and withdrawal symptoms similar to other prescription barbiturates.

Quaaludes are rarely encountered on the streets in the U.S. today, but are occasionally confiscated coming across the border.

History of quaaludes

Quaaludes were first synthesized in India in 1950’s. It was introduced into America in the 1960s and by the late ’60s and ’70s it became a popular recreational drug, often found in discos and referred to as a “disco biscuit”.

  • The abuse potential of Quaaludes soon became apparent and in 1973 methaqualone was placed in Schedule II of the Controlled Substance Act, making it difficult to prescribe and illegal to possess without a prescription.
  • In 1984 it was moved to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) Federal Schedule I, so Quaaludes are no longer legally available in the United States. Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical treatment use in the U.S., and lack accepted safety for use under medical supervision.

Quaaludes dosage

When it was a legal medication, methaqualone was available in tablet and capsule form and came in different strengths.

  • Oral methaqualone dosages ranged from 75 to 150 mg for light sedation.
  • A commonly prescribed dose was 300 mg. Up to 600 mg was used for strong sedation.
  • Tolerance develops rapidly and some users may take up to 2000 mg daily to achieve the same effects.
  • Onset of action is approximately 30 minutes after taking methaqualone and duration of action is between 5 to 8 hours.

Overdose

Quaaludes are a central nervous system (CNS) depressant.

The range of dangerous doses vary widely. Because these drugs are made in illegal labs, the strength and contents of the actual product may not be known, putting the user at even higher risk.

Taking doses of over 300 mg can be dangerous for first-time users. Quaalude doses of about 8,000 mg per day can be fatal, but depend upon the state of the user’s tolerance.

Death can result at much lower doses if Quaaludes are taken with alcohol (ethanol), which is also a central nervous system depressant. “Luding out” where Quaaludes were taken with wine, became a popular college pastime in the 70’s.

Learn MoreDrug abuse: A National Epidemic

Quaaludes use during pregnancy and breastfeeding

Quaaludes are not recommended during pregnancy as the effects on human fetal development are not clear.

There is no data available about the effects of Quaaludes in breastfeeding.

Contraindications

Quaaludes should not be taken with alcohol or with other central nervous system depressants. This increases the depressant effects and can be fatal.

Do not drive or operate machinery while taking Quaaludes.

Quaalude side effects

Common side effects of Quaaludes include:

  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • abdominal cramps
  • fatigue
  • itching
  • rashes
  • sweating
  • dry mouth
  • tingling sensation in arms and legs
  • seizures
  • reduced heart rate
  • slowed breathing (respiration).

Quaaludes can also cause erectile dysfunction and difficulty achieving orgasms. At high doses it can cause mental confusion and loss of muscle control (ataxia).

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